Bumpty Bump Bump From Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

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One more first for the Rosetta mission… sounds of Philae landing on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Rosetta probe to land on comet tomorrow

ESA

The SESAME-CASSE instrument sensors on the feet of the Philae lander recorded the sound at the moment of contact with Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

 

Instruments-Sesame

ESA/ATG medialab

 

Huge and bright new storms are raging on Uranus

uranusIR

The planet Uranus is usually relatively calm when compared to its other companion gas giants in our solar system.  Up until recently if you aimed a telescope at the distant planet you would have just observed a bland and hazy blue-green looking body without a whole lot going on.  However, lately several extremely bright and large storms have been erupting around the northern hemisphere, and 7 years later than its closest approach to the Sun when astronomers would expect any activity to occur.  Some of theses features are now even bright enough to be visible to amateur astronomers with a telescope, and this unusual activity has now sparked great interest in the unusual planet.  It is now an active topic of research to understand these new phenomena since these wild storms were first discovered by astronomer, Dr. Imke de Pater, of the University of California, Berkeley.

Read more about it here:

http://www.space.com/27770-extreme-uranus-storms-puzzle-astronomers.html?adbid=10152450832696466&adbpl=fb&adbpr=17610706465&cmpid=514630_20141114_35587277

LATEST PHOTOS FROM Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

NAVCAM_top_10_at_10_km_4

European Space Agency – ESA

 

This unusual view takes a side-on look down the smaller lobe of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and onto the smoother terrain of the ‘neck’ region. In the background, cliffs of the comet’s large lobe rise from the shadows, adding to the dramatic feel to this image.

This single-frame NAVCAM image measures 1024 x 1024 pixels. It was captured from a distance of 9.8 km from the centre of the comet (7.8 km from the surface) at 22:04 GMT on 23 October 2014. At this distance, the image resolution is 83.5 cm/pixel and the size of the image is 855 x 855 m.

European Space Agency – ESA

 

To see all of the amazing photos from Philae lander visit  http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2014/11

 

 

Rosetta Probe to Land on Comet Tomorrow

Rosetta probe to land on comet tomorrow

Tomorrow, Nov. 12, may mark the first time humans have soft-landed on a comet.  If this is successful it will be courtesy of The European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft which is currently orbiting Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it speeds through space.  Rosetta will release a lander, called Philae, down to the comet’s surface tomorrow while three different space-focused organizations host Rosetta webcasts for all to watch.

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Gaia Satellite Could Detect 70,000 Exoplanets Within 10 Years

Gaia satellite

The Gaia Satellite was launched on December 19 of last year.  It’s mission:  to chart a 3D map of the  Milky Way Galaxy by surveying more than 1 billion stars.  Even though that’s just 1 percent of the stars in the galaxy, its goal is to make the largest, most precise map of where Earth dwells by observing the position of these stars 70 times over five years.  Among other things, this could result in the discovery of up to 70,000 additional alien planets.

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Water Discovery on Neptune-Sized Planet Could Be Key to Finding Earth 2.0

HAT-P-11b, earth 2.0

For the first time, scientists have discovered water on a planet that is smaller than Jupiter.  This is an important discovery because, previous to this find, scientists were unable to see through the cloud layer of smaller, warm planets.  With this recent discovery, scientists now have a better chance of discovering an Earth 2.0

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Ten Amazing Facts About The Milky Way Galaxy

 10 Facts about the milky way

If you think about it, it’s amazing enough that we reside in a solar system within a galaxy that is spinning around a black hole.  The sheer enormity of this galaxy is astonishing on its own.  But I bet there were some things about our galaxy that you didn’t know:  How many possible intelligent alien civilizations could be out there?  What is The Great Attractor?  And how about that raspberry smelling gas cloud?  Yes, there are some very curious details about our galaxy that not a lot of people know.  So let’s get into the Ten Most Amazing Facts About The Milky Way Galaxy:
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Titanosaur: A Supermassive Dinosaur Discovered

Titansaur discovered

Recently, in southern Argentina, the bones of one of the largest creatures to have ever walked the Earth was excavated.  Dreadnoughtus schrani, an enormous sub-group of the long-necked, plant eating sauropods is also known as a titanosaur and is believed to be so large that it was impervious to attack by predators.

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Once You Eat One Planet You Can’t Stop

planet being consumed by sun

Recently, at a press conference at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society, Gongjie Li of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics predicted the death of two exoplanets.   “As far as we know, this is the first time two known exoplanets in a single system have a predicted ‘time of death,’” she said.  The two planets she’s talking about, Kepler-56b and Kepler-56c, are predicted to be swallowed by their star in 130 million and 155 million years, respectively.

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