Lore of the Constellations: Sagittarius the Archer

Welcome back to yet another edition of the Lore of the Constellations.  We are in the season of Summer and so far we have covered three constellations:  Aquila the Eagle, Lyra the Harp, and Cygnus the Swan.  Three constellations part of something called the Summer Triangle.  Now, if you’ve been following these videos you’re aware of how Aquila the Eagle was the pet of Zeus and each day was set up Prometheus to torment him for stealing fire.  Well, today we’re going to go over Sagittarius and how this constellation is connected in the ancient Greek myth with Aquila.

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Lore of the Constellations: Cygnus the Swan

Hello again and welcome back to another Lore of the Constellations.  If you’ve been following these segments you’ll know that the last few videos have been on Aquila the Eagle and Lyra the Harp.  We’re rounding out the three constellations that make up the asterism known as the Summer Triangle now with Cygnus the Swan.

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Lore of the Constellations: Lyra the Harp

Hello and welcome to another installment of the show that delves into the Lore of the Constellations.  If you’re up to date with this series then you are aware we’re in the season of Summer.  And with Summer we can find the appropriately named Summer Triangle asterism.  At each point of this triangle is a bright star within its own respective constellation.

For this video (click on the link above), we’re going to cover the bright star Vega which can also be found in the constellation Lyra the Harp.

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Lore of the Constellations: Aquila the Eagle

Last season, we took a look at some of the more notable constellations that can be found in your seasonal Spring sky.  We’re now in the season of Summer, so let’s take a deep dive into your favorite constellations you can now find from your very own backyard.  You may have heard of the constellation Aquila the Eagle, but did you ever wonder why we recognize that batch of stars with that particular name?  What is it named after? How long ago was this?  Why is this eagle so special.  Well, in these upcoming Lore videos, we’re going to explore how some of your favorite Summer constellations got their names.

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Lore of the Constellations: Corona Borealis

In our last video, Jay Lamm, Planetarium Producer and Technical Manager at the Irene W. Pennington Planetarium in the Louisiana Art & Science Museum, will tell you a little bit about the crown in our sky: Corona Borealis, or, the Northern Crown.

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Lore of the Constellations: Boötes

For video #3 in our special series, Jay Lamm, Planetarium Producer and Technical Manager at the Irene W. Pennington Planetarium in the Louisiana Art & Science Museum, will take you on an exploration behind the meaning and origin of the strange namesake of Boötes, the herdsman.

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Lore of the Constellations: Leo

In this special video series, Jay Lamm, Planetarium Producer and Technical Manager at the Irene W. Pennington Planetarium in the Louisiana Art & Science Museum, will take you on a historical stroll through how some of the most notable Spring constellations got their names.  After all, have you ever wondered what “Boötes” meant or why we honor “Virgo” with a special group of stars?  There will be four videos for four notable constellations.  The first involves the easy to find Leo, the Lion.  Continue reading

Why Neil Armstrong Got to Be the First Man on the Moon

Fifty years ago, Neil Armstrong became the first man to ever walk on the moon.  Since that date, July 20, 1969, the moon has become the subject of much debate and scientific analysis.  From what Neil Armstrong first said as he took those initial steps to conspiracy theories about hoaxes, few historical events have captured the interest in mankind quite like the Apollo 11 moon landing.  However, a few facts about this event have remained obscure through time.

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50 Years Ago–Getting Apollo 11 to the Moon on Less than the Power of a USB Stick

apollo 11, moon walk
More than half a billion people watched the televised first moonwalk that took place on July 20, 1969.  It was a day so historic that space enthusiasts still celebrate it annually.  It was the day that marked the culmination of human endeavor, spirit, and perseverance.  And it can always be summed up in that now-famous sentence uttered by Neil Armstrong, “That is one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

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